Reversing Dementia: Lea Nelson’s Story

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Lea Nelson contacted us after reading Dementia: Keep Your Marbles, saying she was thrilled that we were writing on this topic. This is her story – in her own words – of how she reversed dementia, following one protocol we highlight in the eBook. We are grateful beyond words for Lea’s insights.

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‘Hmm…’ you might be thinking, ‘is it really possible to reverse dementia?’ Well that was exactly what my knowledgeable, 70-something-year-old doctor was thinking when I told him that I thought I had managed to reverse most of my symptoms.

I had sauntered into his office smiling, broadly while clutching a copy of The End of Alzheimer’s by Dr Dale Bredesen in my hand. I was feeling certain that he would be delighted to receive a copy as a present.

‘I don’t want to read it,’ he said grumpily. ‘Even if I did, and advised my other dementia patients accordingly, they would never follow the protocol. It’s all too hard, you see.’

While that might be so, the fact remains that around sixteen months ago the cognitive score I received from Dr Bredesen’s site was 34/100 and now it’s 87/100.

Lea Nelson

I nodded, as I knew this to be true from personal experience with others whom I had urged to follow the protocol. ‘While that might be so,’ I said, ‘the fact remains that around sixteen months ago the cognitive score I received from Dr Bredesen’s site was 34/100 and now it’s 87/100.’

My diagnoses of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA)

He cocked a sceptical brow while bringing up my details on his computer. ‘I see here that your MoCa score back then was 30/30.’ He now turned my way to glare at me, obviously thinking that I was making this all up. I couldn’t blame him as I had only recently become a patient of his.

‘Yes, but MoCa (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) doesn’t test for my rare type of dementia which is Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA),’ I countered. ‘If you read down further, you will notice that I was diagnosed with it in 2017 by a professor of neuropsychology from Sydney Uni. And as they are studying this rare dementia there, she was able to diagnose it accurately.’

Observing his furrowed brow, I realized that he had never heard of this condition. So I decided to explain. ‘As you might realize, it’s non-amnestic, which means that although I’m losing my words and capacity to speak, my working memory and executive functions are intact.’ As an afterthought I added, ‘What I’m trying to tell you is that I’m speaking fairly fluently now because I’ve managed to reverse most of my symptoms.’

At this point he became interested, especially when I asked for a referral to the Brain and Mind Centre at Sydney University where they were studying this rare dementia.

What I’m trying to tell you is that I’m speaking fairly fluently now, because I’ve managed to reverse most of my symptoms.

Lea Nelson

My fresh diagnoses of Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA)

To cut a long story short, I was accepted by the Brain and Mind Centre where I underwent a series of tests over three days in November 2023. And happily, my report indicated that my Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-III score was 88/100. So I had indeed managed to reverse most of my PPA symptoms.

Unfortunately, my MRI scans showed that I also had another rare dementia known as Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA), or shrinkage at the back of the brain. This is an insidious dementia where the brain tricks the eyes into seeing the objects and surroundings in one’s immediate environment as forever moving and never still.

The following video, which is only seven minutes long, will give you a good idea of the symptoms associated with this little known dementia. – Do I see what you see? – Rare Dementia Support

Fortunately for me, my symptoms are, as yet, very mild. They had started while in my fifties with strange eye problems that couldn’t be accounted for. I recall how my ophthalmologist at the time had jokingly told me then, that it was my brain that was the problem, not my eyes. So all I could do was put up with my symptoms.

Fortunately for me, my symptoms are, as yet, very mild. They had started while in my fifties with strange eye problems that couldn’t be accounted for.

Lea Nelson

2017 marked a distinct deterioration

By 2017 I was forced to give up driving because I was unable to judge the distance of the car in front of me. I also suffered from other spatial problems which I put down to poor eyesight. Even by November 2023, I would never have realized that I had PCA if it were not for the MRI scans and cognitive report from the Brain and Mind Centre that followed.

Unfortunately, it is estimated that thousands with so-called eye problems may in fact have this disease without being aware of it. The main reason is that optometrists and ophthalmologists are not able to discern the problem because it has to do with brain sight, rather than eyesight.

Unfortunately, it is estimated that thousands with so-called eye problems may in fact have this disease without being aware of it. The main reason is that optometrists and ophthalmologists are not able to discern the problem because it has to do with brain sight, rather than eyesight.

Lea Nelson

The reason for writing this blog post

This brings me directly to the crux of why I am writing this blog post. You see, when I started to follow Dr Bredesen’s protocol, I skipped the most important aspect, namely, testing for toxins, heavy metals, parasites, and gut problems. So now I am on the back foot having to play catchup.

I therefore urge those diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment, or even the early stages of Alzheimer’s, not to overlook the possibility that these factors could be a major cause of their cognitive decline.

Following Dr Bredesen’s Protocol

In his book The End of Alzheimer’s, Dr Dale Bredesen identifies thirty-six factors that affect whether or not the brain goes down a synapse-destroying pathway that ends in Dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. He refers to these factors as being thirty-six holes in a roof that need fixing in order to reverse cognitive decline. He goes on to stress that in order to ascertain the size of each hole for each person, it is important that laboratory tests be done.

Having persuaded myself that I didn’t have toxins, heavy metals or parasites, I skipped the lab tests, opting to follow instead his comprehensive program of nutrition, exercise, synapse-supporting supplements, specific herbs, sleep optimization, and stress reduction. You can view the nutritional aspects of his protocol by clicking on this link: https://www.apollohealthco.com/ketoflex-12-3/

when I started to follow Dr Bredesen’s protocol, I skipped the most important aspect, namely, testing for toxins, heavy metals, parasites, and gut problems. So now, I am on the back foot having to play catchup.

Lea Nelson

Embracing the requirement for lab tests

The first thing I did after discovering that I had Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) was to dig deep into the research on PCA and to join the relevant forums on Facebook.

One day, while reading the posts in one of these forums, an amazing thing happened: Dr Bredesen joined the forum. And because I had mentioned his name in the post I had just written, he contacted me personally and urged me to undertake a comprehensive test for mycotoxins, which he said were present in most, if not all, patients with PCA.

Nevertheless, I soon realised that following his advice would prove easier said than done. For one thing, I wasn’t sure whether any laboratories in Australia offered the type of test required. And if so, whether the test would indicate whether the wall of the gut was permeable enough to let the mycotoxins, through thus enabling them to cross the blood-brain barrier.

The Complete Microbiome Mapping Test

For those who are interested, I found that the Complete Microbiome Mapping Test offered by the NutriPATH lab in Melbourne did just that. Although on the expensive side, the results were detailed and included explanations as well as treatments for the various conditions that needed to be addressed. The treatments not only included pharmaceutical medicines, but also relevant herbs and supplements.

You can view an example of a typical Microbiome Mapping Test result here

Conclusion

I have learnt much on my journey with dementia. While I am still doing well in relation to reversing the symptoms associated with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA), I am also hopeful that I will be able halt the progression of my PCA condition, being now aware of the medicinal treatments and supplements that are available to me.

I am truly blessed that my PCA condition was diagnosed while my symptoms were still mild. What gives me hope for the future is the fact that hundreds of dementia patients have now managed to reverse their symptoms by following Dr Bredesen’s protocol.

Needless to say, it has been a major challenge to keep to the protocol. And ‘cheating’ in relation to the diet has been par for the course for me. But one soon realises that falling off the wagon, so to speak, is taking a backward step especially when symptoms start to reappear.

By contrast, each noticeable improvement helps to spur one on to keep going. It also fills one with the hope of the possibility of being able to live out one’s life with family and friends to the very end.

Kim, I am thrilled that you have written a book on this topic. The only barrier to people following your advice is lack of discipline and failing to do the hard yards. Then, there are the neuropsychologists and medical doctors who fail to point them in the right direction, because they are still following 20th century medicine.

Lea Nelson

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Discover the real causes, lack of cures & the practical steps you can take to delay, prevent, even reverse Dementia – including Bredesen’s protocol & more – in plain English in Dementia: Keep Your Marbles. Click below to see what’s inside.

Dementia

DEMENTIA:
KEEP YOUR MARBLES

Discover how Aussie boomers can delay or prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

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